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January 2011: Tips, eNews, and More!


 
Happy New Year!

We hope you had a wonderful holiday season and are now relaxed, rested and ready to face 2012 head on.

Thank you to everyone who offered us advice regarding improving the experience at our office. Many of your suggestions are being incorporated into our office for the New Year. Congratulations to our draw winners Sheila Hill!

 
January 15-21 is National Non-Smoking Week
If ending a relationship with tobacco is on your list of things to do in 2012, now is a great time to start. You can find helpful advice on how to quit and more about National Non-Smoking Week here. Remember, in addition to your lungs and heart, tobacco use stains your teeth, damages your mouth's soft tissues and increases your chance of developing oral cancer. If quitting is proving more difficult than you anticipated, we may be able to help.

Is Your Dental Insurance Based on the Calendar Year?
If you have any outstanding dental work to be completed or are maintaining an oral health and hygiene routine that corresponds to your dental benefits, now is the time to come in and see us. You can request an appointment here.

Until next month,

The Team at St. Clair Dental Associates



Are You Still a Smoker?

 
The effects of smoking have been the focus of health campaigns for many years now. Campaigns often focus on the lung and heart problems linked to smoking. St. Clair Dental Associates would like to offer you oral health related reasons to turn your back on tobacco.

While the effects of tobacco use on your heart and lungs may be hidden from public view, the effects on your oral health are often as clear as the smile on your face.

You may view smoking as sociable and appealing. The actual impression you may offer to others may include:
  • Stained Teeth
  • Bad Breath
  • Dry Mouth
  • Leukoplakia (Irritated patches on the tongue and Tissues inside your mouth)



Are You Putting Your Smile Under Pressure?

Watching a thrilling movie or the championship game can be a 'nail biting' experience.The excitement has us sitting at the edge of our seats, our hearts pounding... and some of us even taking the 'nail biting' aspect literally.

 
How does nail biting affect your teeth?

The primary issue with nail biting is the pressure it puts on your front teeth. These teeth are not built to withstand the same amount of pressure that your molars are. Nail biting can cause the enamel protecting your teeth to fracture as well as wearing down and chipping the edges. Despite being the hardest substance in your body, enamel is by no means invincible.

Chewing your nails creates rough edges which can cut the tissue in your mouth. Complicating this is the presence of bacteria and fungi that are on your fingers and under your nails. When you bite your nails you put yourself at an increased risk of infection, by giving these bacteria a new way to access your mouth and even your bloodstream. Conversely, the mouth has many bacteria that can infect your finger tips.

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  © 2012 St Clair Dental Associates

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